General Statement on the Right to Development

“With regard to the right to development”, which is referenced in the following resolutions: L.1 (international cooperation), L.8 (illicit funds), L.14 (foreign debt), L.15 (cultural rights), L.16 (right to food), L.19 (environment), L.20 (ESC rights), L.26, (right to work), and L.28 (rights of the child), we would like to note the following. The concerns of the United States about the existence of a “right to development” are long-standing and well known. The “right to development” does not have an agreed international meaning. Furthermore, work is needed to make it consistent with human rights, which the international community recognizes as universal rights held and enjoyed by individuals and which every individual may demand from his or her own government‎. Of course, this position does not suggest in any way that the United States is opposed to development per se. To the contrary, the United States contributes more to international development than any other nation and has provided donor assistance to those in need on every continent, including through the US Agency for International Development, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and the PEPFAR program.
Thank you.

print  Print