35th Anniversary of the Entry into Force of the CITES Convention

Siberian Tiger: The US has been a consistent advocate for strong action within CITES to control the illegal trade in tigers and other Asian big cats
Siberian Tiger: The US has been a consistent advocate for strong action within CITES to control the illegal trade in tigers and other Asian big cats

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) celebrates the 35th anniversary of its entry into force on July 1, 2010.

“By being a pioneer in adopting trade measures to prevent overexploitation and relying on scientific advice for the authorization of wildlife trade, CITES has put the machinery in place to contribute to the improved management of the key natural assets of our planet.”

Ambassador Betty E. King
Permanent Representative of the Mission of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other International Organizations in Geneva.

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) is a multinational agreement that entered into force in 1975 to prevent species from becoming endangered or extinct because of international trade. Under this treaty, countries work together to ensure that international trade in animal and plant species is not detrimental to the survival of wild populations by regulating the import, export, re-export, and introduction from the sea of certain animal and plant species. The goal is to ensure that any trade in protected plant and animal species is sustainable and based on sound biological understanding and principles.

Read the CITES press release on the occasion of the 35th Anniversary.

For more information about U.S. engagement in CITES, please visit the homepage of the U.S. Delegation to the CITES convention: https://www.cites.org/